(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Poland Russia and Great Britain 1941-1945"

Council of the U.S.S.R. dated November 29, 1939, and the Citizenship of
the U.S.S.R. Act of August 19, 1938.
In its Note of December 1, 1941, the People's Commissariat for Foreign
Affairs informed the Embassy that the Soviet Government were prepared,
by way of exception, to regard as Polish citizens persons of Polish 'origin
living in the territories of the above-mentioned districts on November 1-2,
1939. The People's Commissariat for Foreign Affairs is bound to state
that, despite the good-will of the Soviet Government thus manifested, the
Polish Government has adopted a negative attitude to the above statement
of the Soviet Government and has refused to take the appropriate steps,
putting^ forward demands contrary to the sovereign rights of the Soviet
Union in respect to these territories.
In connection with the above, the People's Commissariat for Foreign
Affairs, on instructions from the Soviet Government, gives notice that the
statement included in the Note of December 1, 1941, regarding the readi-
ness to treat some categories of persons of Polish origin on an exceptional
basis must be considered as without validity and that the question of the
possible non-application to such persons of the laws governing citizenship
of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics has ceased to exist.
EXCERPT FROM THE NOTE OF MARCH 8, 1943, FROM THE
POLISH EMBASSY IN KUYBYSHEV TO THE PEOPLE'S
COMMISSARIAT FOR FOREIGN AFFAIRS, CONCERNING THE
FORCING OF SOVIET CITIZENSHIP UPON POLISH CITIZENS.
The Embassy of the Republic of Poland has the honor to inform the
People's Commissariat for Foreign Affairs that reports from a number of
places in the U.S.S.R. indicate that local Soviet authorities are employing
methods of compulsion described in the Embassy's Note No. 307/21/43 of
March 6, 1943.
In the town of Syzran, district of Kuybyshev, officials of the People's
Commissariat for Internal Affairs are threatening with imprisonment or
confinement in labor camps all Polish citizens who refuse to accept Soviet
passports. Endeavours are also being made to persuade those who resist
by the argument that " Poland no longer exists," which is flagrantly
inconsistent with the obligations undertaken by the Government of the
Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. Those refusing to accept Soviet
citizenship are as a rule kept in confinement without food or water until
they sign a-document agreeing to accept a Soviet passport.
Similar reports are coming in from the Krasnoyarsky Kray, and the
Kirov, Kuybyshev and Akmolinsk districts. In the town of Kuybyshev
three inmates of the Embassy's Home for Invalids are still under detention
without food or drink.
Fragmentary information which has succeeded in reaching the Embassy
indicates that many hundreds of persons have been affected by these
arrests. . . .
EXCERPTS FROM AMBASSADOR ROMER'S CONVERSATION
WITH PREMIER STALIN AND MOLOTOV, PEOPLE'S COM-
MISSAR FOR FOREIGN AFFAIRS, AT THE KREMLIN DURING
THE NIGHT OF FEBRUARY 26-27, 1943.
Roiner : I should still like to discuss the problem of Polish-Soviet
relations which unfortunately are passing through a crisis> causing anxiety.
We have just ended a friendly discussion on a number of important subjects
dealing with military collaboration between our countries. But such
529